ironymaiden: (fall)
I bought eight kinds of apple yesterday. Three i had never heard of before.

This post brought to you by knitta D's apple obsession, and Yakima.
ironymaiden: (chinstrap)
yesterday was one of the sweet fine days days on the edge of autumn - bright, warm, glorious. (okay, it could have been cooler. but it also didn't require sunglasses, so I'll take it.)

i got out of bed like it was a workday, and met up with [livejournal.com profile] mimerki, [livejournal.com profile] e_bourne, and knitta D to visit a fiber mill on Whidbey Island.

we got to ride in Adrian, and we practically drove right onto the ferry. we found a great spot for breakfast in Langley, with quirky decor and a thing for apples.



then we toured the mill, which is small but mighty. the equipment came from Oklahoma and Indiana; we are beneficiaries of the decline of the US textile industry. I came home with pin-drafted roving made from Washington wool, alpaca, and angora. its all so pretty and soft. We were amused that there are tufts of fiber all over the place, including the gravel driveway. they foisted apples on us from their trees, and gave us bottles of water, and there was much fiber nerdery.








after that, we hit Whidbey Island Distillery. the tour was very cool, with a bit of serendipity- we were there at the same time as the Metropolitan club. fun facts: their spirits are distilled from local wine and they get the wine in trade (half the distillate goes back to the wineries to make fortified wines) the still itself is computer controlled and the distiller can adjust it remotely from his phone.

then we tooled around Langley some more, where we saw these awesome sheep and goat portraits, and got ice cream. Then we had another lovely ferry ride. It was a truly superior day.
ironymaiden: (washington)
part one here
part two here

we bid a fond farewell to the Pacific coast and headed back towards our base on Hood Canal via the Hoh rainforest.

i prefer the Hoh to the Quilcene. the trails in the Hoh were more luxuriantly moss-covered, and it was easy to get mom to places where she could see giant trees. but it was also the jumping-off point for more difficult trails to return to later.
Hoh rainforest

there are signs all over outside the visitor center (closed, we never did show up at the park when one was open) that people have been hassling elk and getting charged. eep. we do the accessible loop trail with mom and then run into a young woman who whispers that there are two elk *right over there*.
demure

we did a lot of silent watching while i shot many-many photos. the elk were standing right at the beginning of the Hall of Mosses trail, which was the walk dad and i were there to take. we wandered away for a little to see if they would move on. nope, those salmonberry bushes were delicious and far from gone. eventually we did what several others did - moved slowly and quietly, averted our eyes, and walked right by. an unconcerned elk proceeded to take a leak just as i was passing within arm's reach. for future reference, they smell like horses.

the trail is wonderful. i kept expecting ents.

Fangorn

the next day, we headed to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival via the Port Townsend-Keystone ferry and Whidbey island.
Deception Pass

there was a ton of construction when we got there, and we spent more time in the Pendleton outlet (mom's favorite) than i had patience for, but it was a sparkling day and a good last stop before getting the units pizza and an orgasm at Madame K's and dropping them at an airport hotel.

tulip festival

tulip festival
ironymaiden: (washington)
part one here
part two here

we bid a fond farewell to the Pacific coast and headed back towards our base on Hood Canal via the Hoh rainforest.

i prefer the Hoh to the Quilcene. the trails in the Hoh were more luxuriantly moss-covered, and it was easy to get mom to places where she could see giant trees. but it was also the jumping-off point for more difficult trails to return to later.
Hoh rainforest

there are signs all over outside the visitor center (closed, we never did show up at the park when one was open) that people have been hassling elk and getting charged. eep. we do the accessible loop trail with mom and then run into a young woman who whispers that there are two elk *right over there*.
demure

we did a lot of silent watching while i shot many-many photos. the elk were standing right at the beginning of the Hall of Mosses trail, which was the walk dad and i were there to take. we wandered away for a little to see if they would move on. nope, those salmonberry bushes were delicious and far from gone. eventually we did what several others did - moved slowly and quietly, averted our eyes, and walked right by. an unconcerned elk proceeded to take a leak just as i was passing within arm's reach. for future reference, they smell like horses.

the trail is wonderful. i kept expecting ents.

Fangorn

the next day, we headed to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival via the Port Townsend-Keystone ferry and Whidbey island.
Deception Pass

there was a ton of construction when we got there, and we spent more time in the Pendleton outlet (mom's favorite) than i had patience for, but it was a sparkling day and a good last stop before getting the units pizza and an orgasm at Madame K's and dropping them at an airport hotel.

tulip festival

tulip festival
ironymaiden: (washington)
part one is here

so...it turns out my teenaged niece A is a Twilighter. since we were wandering through the area where the books are set, i decided to be a cool aunt and take pictures for her. the effort to attract Twihard dollars is sometimes very clever and sometimes just pathetic. both approaches seem to be working, so more power to all the entrepreneurs scoring during the recession. this was my favorite:

treaty line

the set is here.

Forks is...familiar to anyone who grew up in an economically depressed rural area. La Push, the Quileute village, is much more appealing to me. it's on a spit of land facing James Island, between Rialto Beach and First Beach (if i understand correctly, First Beach is part of the reservation, but the surrounding beaches are part of the national park although the tribe has hunting/fishing/gathering rights there). i reiterate that we had a great experience as guests of the Quileute Nation and it's a perfect place to stay.

this was the view from our balcony.

the view

i only had to step out the sliding door to take this one.
first beach
anyway, sunsets, surfers, and fishing boats were right there while we sipped tea.

our first morning at La Push, i was out of bed before seven and off to scout Second Beach. it can only be reached on foot, from a wooded path over the headland - mom has limited mobility, so i wanted to see if it was something she could walk. no, definitely not. while the trail is relatively easy if you don't have a disability, it's still uphill then downhill with a long series of stairs, followed by a scramble over a wide and ungroomed field of logs. on First Beach there is the occasional path cut with a chainsaw. here, no civilization except for a demure privy on a spur off the main path and a target sign so that you can find the trailhead from the beach. i was the only person there that morning.

second beach

it was the new moon, so the tide was way way out and i could walk right up to rocks covered in tidal life.
second beach

apparently i was too busy taking pictures to see the otter go by.
sneaky little thing
ironymaiden: (washington)
part one is here

so...it turns out my teenaged niece A is a Twilighter. since we were wandering through the area where the books are set, i decided to be a cool aunt and take pictures for her. the effort to attract Twihard dollars is sometimes very clever and sometimes just pathetic. both approaches seem to be working, so more power to all the entrepreneurs scoring during the recession. this was my favorite:

treaty line

the set is here.

Forks is...familiar to anyone who grew up in an economically depressed rural area. La Push, the Quileute village, is much more appealing to me. it's on a spit of land facing James Island, between Rialto Beach and First Beach (if i understand correctly, First Beach is part of the reservation, but the surrounding beaches are part of the national park although the tribe has hunting/fishing/gathering rights there). i reiterate that we had a great experience as guests of the Quileute Nation and it's a perfect place to stay.

this was the view from our balcony.

the view

i only had to step out the sliding door to take this one.
first beach
anyway, sunsets, surfers, and fishing boats were right there while we sipped tea.

our first morning at La Push, i was out of bed before seven and off to scout Second Beach. it can only be reached on foot, from a wooded path over the headland - mom has limited mobility, so i wanted to see if it was something she could walk. no, definitely not. while the trail is relatively easy if you don't have a disability, it's still uphill then downhill with a long series of stairs, followed by a scramble over a wide and ungroomed field of logs. on First Beach there is the occasional path cut with a chainsaw. here, no civilization except for a demure privy on a spur off the main path and a target sign so that you can find the trailhead from the beach. i was the only person there that morning.

second beach

it was the new moon, so the tide was way way out and i could walk right up to rocks covered in tidal life.
second beach

apparently i was too busy taking pictures to see the otter go by.
sneaky little thing
ironymaiden: (washington)
i'm still kind of exhausted, but Olympic National Park is wonderful and i want to go back with C in tow the entire time and a better plan. we only had one full day of rain, and that day was spent driving, and visiting beaches that are still awesome in the rain. that rainy day was also the first of our two-night stay at the Quileute nation's resort, which is very nice in an understated way and is right on the beach. highly recommended. more about that later, along with elk and tulips.

get your boots on

we stumbled onto prime shellfish harvesting time at a state park on our way to Hurricane Ridge.

hurricane_ridge_0052

and it was foggy and snowy at the top of the mountain. sometime i will go there later in the year and actually see more. as we drove back down we got below cloud level and could see well out into the Strait of Juan de Fuca when we weren't staring at the blacktail deer.

bored with tourists

after that day, we started traveling the southern route of the 101 loop, which for us was faster since we weren't crawling along the (oh so scenic) Hood Canal at 35mph. which led us to the nearer rainforest.

Quinault rain forest

after that, we had a quiet day where our main activity was getting C to the Bremerton ferry. and then we struck out for the Pacific coast.

Rialto beach

the thing to do with the picture of the rock is to view it at original size and count the starfish. (i've found at least 19.)
ironymaiden: (washington)
i'm still kind of exhausted, but Olympic National Park is wonderful and i want to go back with C in tow the entire time and a better plan. we only had one full day of rain, and that day was spent driving, and visiting beaches that are still awesome in the rain. that rainy day was also the first of our two-night stay at the Quileute nation's resort, which is very nice in an understated way and is right on the beach. highly recommended. more about that later, along with elk and tulips.

get your boots on

we stumbled onto prime shellfish harvesting time at a state park on our way to Hurricane Ridge.

hurricane_ridge_0052

and it was foggy and snowy at the top of the mountain. sometime i will go there later in the year and actually see more. as we drove back down we got below cloud level and could see well out into the Strait of Juan de Fuca when we weren't staring at the blacktail deer.

bored with tourists

after that day, we started traveling the southern route of the 101 loop, which for us was faster since we weren't crawling along the (oh so scenic) Hood Canal at 35mph. which led us to the nearer rainforest.

Quinault rain forest

after that, we had a quiet day where our main activity was getting C to the Bremerton ferry. and then we struck out for the Pacific coast.

Rialto beach

the thing to do with the picture of the rock is to view it at original size and count the starfish. (i've found at least 19.)

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