ironymaiden: (beholder)

Four goals, four players. CUT OFF ONE HEAD, TWO MORE WILL RISE something i saw

ironymaiden: (beholder)

Witness to unboxing Bears vs Babies something i saw

ironymaiden: (arty)

I'm finally spinning the rest of the fiber that became a felted dog toy. It's...challenging. I couldn't find the right settings for my wheel, so I pulled out a drop spindle for the first time in months.

Now when the fiber is clumpy or suddenly breaks it's no big deal. (Although I hate having this not-cheap spindle hit the floor.)

This stuff has little blobs of short fiber in it (neps). You can either obsessively pick them out, or make lumpy yarn.

It's neps all the way down. Let's just call it rustic texture and admire the colors. something i saw

ironymaiden: (beholder)

It's my first bus trip with the sidekick. something i saw

ironymaiden: (beholder)

Somehow I always end up at table 9. something i saw

ironymaiden: (tinkerer)
i'm still experimenting with how to best embed photos in DW, since their hosting is so limited. (for on-the-go, i've got IFTTT hotlinking Instagram, thanks to [personal profile] peartreealley and this applet with a few key edits.)

today i'm trying Google Photos, which works pretty well as of tonight. (if you're an Android user, you probably know about this thing. it's not the same as putting photos in a folder on Google Drive, which confused me for some time.)

Edit to add: as with any photo hosting, if you do something to delete the photo, the photo is gone and you will break the link. Google Photos is pretty aggressive about turning on their back up service on phones. if that's enabled, it will also bother you about deleting the originals from your phone. if you do "free up space" inside the Google Photos app, all is well. if you go into your phone's "gallery" or folders or other not-Google Photos app and delete the original, Google Photos will sync and delete the photo from your cloud storage. tl;dr use the Google Photos app when you want to clean up your phone storage.


  1. in Google photos (https://drive.google.com/drive/photos or https://photos.google.com/), select the photo you want to share.


  2. if you're on the drive.google page, click the link icon on the upper right and switch link sharing to ON. if you're on the photos.google page, click the share icon on the upper right and select Get link. (yeah, i don't know why there are two interfaces with slightly different features either. actually i can guess. software people be crazy.)

    copy that link.


  3. now we cheat. go to this page (and bookmark it): https://ctrlq.org/google/photos/. paste the link in the box and click Generate Code.


  4. at the bottom of the page, you have links to the photos. if you know how to write an img tag, img src= that "Direct Link (URL)".

    otherwise, take the "Image Embed Code" and paste it into your draft entry. the way it's written, the image will display in your entry, and clicking it will take the viewer to the image in your Google Photos.


if you don't want to directly associate your Google Photos ID with your DW, you can get rid of the link part. delete everything before <img src= and then also delete the </a> at the end.*

example embed with the link removed:

mmmmmm raclette.

*i note that the developer identifies as a facebook link and his origin site. i'm not sure what that part is for. personal promo? to satisfy some google rule? anyone know? also, i can't promise that this dude isn't using your photos for his machine learning project or his spank bank.
ironymaiden: (beholder)

Just another day at the office. (Enjoying being outside before the heat hits this weekend.) something i saw

ironymaiden: (beholder)

Eclipse sat by me on the bus today. She takes herself to the dog park a few times a week. Note the bus pass. something i saw

ironymaiden: (midas conflict)

ironymaiden: (beholder)
tonight was my second photo class. we met by the pig at the Market and spent the evening doing
hands-on shutter speed exercises. fun stuff - making waving arms disappear, stopping water mid-flow, panning to get a sharp moving object in the foreground and blur in the background.

my key takeaway from tonight was this: (per my teacher) the amount of information we have to absorb in the first few classes is overwhelming by design. we shouldn't really expect to feel competent about exposure until class six. and the shots we're taking now shouldn't be as good as ones we were taking before when we used auto settings because the camera on auto makes good choices and we don't know what the hell we're doing yet.

while ostensibly concentrating on shutter speed, i also absorbed more about choosing ISO and how to read histograms. i still don't feel the 18% gray thing in my bones, but tonight i feel more confident that it will make sense soon. also, i got more info about next week's critique: there's nothing wrong with choosing a favorite photo that is not my most technically proficient photo, because one of the things i will get out of the critique is what changes i need to make it a more ideal shot (and if i can correct that on the computer or if i need to recreate the shot with better settings).

so now i get to have more joy and less fear. i must fail in front of people in order to improve. it's going to be okay.
ironymaiden: (Seattle)
my solstice parade pictures are up. (i flagged the nekkid people, so you have to actively choose to see genitals at work.)

my favorite group was inspired by Hieronymus Bosch.
ironymaiden: (Default)
my solstice parade pictures are up. (i flagged the nekkid people, so you have to actively choose to see genitals at work.)

my favorite group was inspired by Hieronymus Bosch.
ironymaiden: (washington)
part one here
part two here

we bid a fond farewell to the Pacific coast and headed back towards our base on Hood Canal via the Hoh rainforest.

i prefer the Hoh to the Quilcene. the trails in the Hoh were more luxuriantly moss-covered, and it was easy to get mom to places where she could see giant trees. but it was also the jumping-off point for more difficult trails to return to later.
Hoh rainforest

there are signs all over outside the visitor center (closed, we never did show up at the park when one was open) that people have been hassling elk and getting charged. eep. we do the accessible loop trail with mom and then run into a young woman who whispers that there are two elk *right over there*.
demure

we did a lot of silent watching while i shot many-many photos. the elk were standing right at the beginning of the Hall of Mosses trail, which was the walk dad and i were there to take. we wandered away for a little to see if they would move on. nope, those salmonberry bushes were delicious and far from gone. eventually we did what several others did - moved slowly and quietly, averted our eyes, and walked right by. an unconcerned elk proceeded to take a leak just as i was passing within arm's reach. for future reference, they smell like horses.

the trail is wonderful. i kept expecting ents.

Fangorn

the next day, we headed to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival via the Port Townsend-Keystone ferry and Whidbey island.
Deception Pass

there was a ton of construction when we got there, and we spent more time in the Pendleton outlet (mom's favorite) than i had patience for, but it was a sparkling day and a good last stop before getting the units pizza and an orgasm at Madame K's and dropping them at an airport hotel.

tulip festival

tulip festival
ironymaiden: (washington)
part one here
part two here

we bid a fond farewell to the Pacific coast and headed back towards our base on Hood Canal via the Hoh rainforest.

i prefer the Hoh to the Quilcene. the trails in the Hoh were more luxuriantly moss-covered, and it was easy to get mom to places where she could see giant trees. but it was also the jumping-off point for more difficult trails to return to later.
Hoh rainforest

there are signs all over outside the visitor center (closed, we never did show up at the park when one was open) that people have been hassling elk and getting charged. eep. we do the accessible loop trail with mom and then run into a young woman who whispers that there are two elk *right over there*.
demure

we did a lot of silent watching while i shot many-many photos. the elk were standing right at the beginning of the Hall of Mosses trail, which was the walk dad and i were there to take. we wandered away for a little to see if they would move on. nope, those salmonberry bushes were delicious and far from gone. eventually we did what several others did - moved slowly and quietly, averted our eyes, and walked right by. an unconcerned elk proceeded to take a leak just as i was passing within arm's reach. for future reference, they smell like horses.

the trail is wonderful. i kept expecting ents.

Fangorn

the next day, we headed to the Skagit Valley Tulip Festival via the Port Townsend-Keystone ferry and Whidbey island.
Deception Pass

there was a ton of construction when we got there, and we spent more time in the Pendleton outlet (mom's favorite) than i had patience for, but it was a sparkling day and a good last stop before getting the units pizza and an orgasm at Madame K's and dropping them at an airport hotel.

tulip festival

tulip festival
ironymaiden: (washington)
part one is here

so...it turns out my teenaged niece A is a Twilighter. since we were wandering through the area where the books are set, i decided to be a cool aunt and take pictures for her. the effort to attract Twihard dollars is sometimes very clever and sometimes just pathetic. both approaches seem to be working, so more power to all the entrepreneurs scoring during the recession. this was my favorite:

treaty line

the set is here.

Forks is...familiar to anyone who grew up in an economically depressed rural area. La Push, the Quileute village, is much more appealing to me. it's on a spit of land facing James Island, between Rialto Beach and First Beach (if i understand correctly, First Beach is part of the reservation, but the surrounding beaches are part of the national park although the tribe has hunting/fishing/gathering rights there). i reiterate that we had a great experience as guests of the Quileute Nation and it's a perfect place to stay.

this was the view from our balcony.

the view

i only had to step out the sliding door to take this one.
first beach
anyway, sunsets, surfers, and fishing boats were right there while we sipped tea.

our first morning at La Push, i was out of bed before seven and off to scout Second Beach. it can only be reached on foot, from a wooded path over the headland - mom has limited mobility, so i wanted to see if it was something she could walk. no, definitely not. while the trail is relatively easy if you don't have a disability, it's still uphill then downhill with a long series of stairs, followed by a scramble over a wide and ungroomed field of logs. on First Beach there is the occasional path cut with a chainsaw. here, no civilization except for a demure privy on a spur off the main path and a target sign so that you can find the trailhead from the beach. i was the only person there that morning.

second beach

it was the new moon, so the tide was way way out and i could walk right up to rocks covered in tidal life.
second beach

apparently i was too busy taking pictures to see the otter go by.
sneaky little thing

Profile

ironymaiden: (Default)
ironymaiden

July 2017

S M T W T F S
      1
2 345 678
91011 12 13 1415
1617 1819 202122
23242526272829
3031     

Syndicate

RSS Atom

Most Popular Tags

Style Credit

Expand Cut Tags

No cut tags
Page generated Jul. 28th, 2017 04:40 am
Powered by Dreamwidth Studios